Palmisano: Obamacare's Flaws Coming to Light
Palmisano: Obamacare's Flaws Coming to Light | Louisiana Medical News, Health Care Reform

Donald J. Palmisano, MD
CPPR Members and Supporters:
 
The discussion over health care continues.  As provisions of the Administration's health care bill are beginning to roll out, we're starting to see some of the unintended, but not entirely surprising, consequences of the law. 

One of my goals is to keep you well informed of new developments in the health care debate.  These are fast moving developments and it is important that we remain focused on protecting patient's rights. 

In the media, news articles continue to highlight the frustrations brought on by the passed health care bill.   Earlier this month, Politico wrote a story on the heated legal debate between 20 states and the federal government.  The article mentions these states may soon be granted permission "to proceed with at least a portion of their lawsuit."  Along with the National Federation of Independent Business, these states are challenging the Administration's key provision that requires almost all Americans to purchase health care insurance.  The article also states the Administration tried vigorously to end the suit by asking U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson to dismiss the lawsuit.  According to Politico, Vinson has scheduled to hear oral arguments on December 16 and announced he "plans to issue a complete ruling by October 14." 

In another recent article, the Phoenix Business Journal's talks about additional burdens produced by the health care bill.   The Journal refers to the bill as a "paperwork nightmare," and states, "Republicans and Democrats agreed the bill's tax reporting requirements need to change."   The article also sheds light on the legislation's $17 billion price tag and how new requirements for American businesses are expected to help pay for the legislation.     

The health care insurance industry has already begun taking action to avoid full compliance with the Administration’s health care law.  Unfortunately, one of these changes directly impacts America’s most vulnerable patients, our children.  A Washington Post article said earlier last week, that several “prominent health insurance companies have decided to stop offering new child-only plans, rather than comply with rules in the new health-care law that will require such plans to start accepting children with preexisting medical conditions after Sept. 23.”  Although these companies claim they will continue to honor current child-only policies, the future treatment and acceptance of these policies remains uncertain. 

In my last email, I expressed concerns over the health care bill's flaws after a new survey indicated how overall healthcare costs will actually increase following the bill's passage.  I was not surprised by the negative results of this survey.  These increased costs will add to the difficulty of patients getting the care they so desperately need.  In my statement, I also mentioned a Harvard study on medical liability costs in the United States, which the health care bill fails to address.  According to the Harvard study, "the price of the current medical malpractice system is over $55 billion a year."  The money doctors spend defending themselves from malpractice lawsuits in the flawed system is an unnecessary waste of money.  This spending could instead be used to provide patients with better health care or even to reduce overall costs.    

The flaws of the enacted Health care bill are steadily coming to light.  To read more about the articles mentioned, I encourage you to visit our website at, http://www.protectpatientsrights.org/.  This debate needs your input.   You can help protect patients' rights by standing strong with us.  The Coalition to Protect Patient's Rights needs your help and thanks you for your support.  
 
 
DJP 
 

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